Saturday, December 31, 2016

2016: A Death Knell to Baby Boomer Feminists

You know as well as I do that Hillary Clinton felt entitled to the U.S. presidency as no other candidate has in my lifetime. The worst part was her continued playing of the gender card - women HAD to vote for Hillary because she's a woman. So what did she do? She provided critics (including myself) with fodder when she allowed herself to become the very stereotype that women fight most when she was too emotionally fragile to handle her defeat.

I struggle to this day, as we usher out 2016, a full 54 days since the night of November 8, 2016 to understand what kind of role model she thought she was showing to younger women running for office. Hillary Clinton was too consumed with uncontrollable crying and outrage to do the most basic and the most important gesture any political candidate knows to do - go before her supporters in the victory party room and her voters watching on television to thank them. Instead of pulling herself together, she sent out her top minion, John Podesta, to address the crowd. Granted, many of those gathered had already begun to leave once the defeat was obvious, but Hillary Clinton was too self-absorbed to even do a brief thank you to those most loyal to her.

Hillary Clinton is in her own little bubble, sure, and she surrounds herself with people enabling her to live that life, but she ran on being tough and strong - ready to break the glass ceiling of being the first woman president. The irony is that a glass ceiling was indeed broken that night but not the one she droned on about. Donald Trump's campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, broke another kind of glass. Conway, a Republican woman, became the first woman campaign manager to successfully run a presidential campaign.

Clinton has lived off the coattails of her husband throughout her entire career, while pronouncing herself the top feminist in the country. Thank goodness the Trump campaign went after an electoral college win instead of being consumed with the popular vote. Also important to note, the Republican candidate was able to think as traditional politicians do not and he made a play for non-traditional Republican voters, as well as those in blue states. It paid off.

Saddest of all is the reaction of leftist women who voted for Hillary Clinton. I see their posts on Facebook and Twitter. They are so consumed, still to this day, with anger over her loss that they relish ridiculing Conway's difficulty in placing her four young children in private schools in D.C. - how's that for solidarity? When a leftist tells you that all women must act one way, remember it is a one-way street for them. They have yet to learn the lessons of this election. It's good for Republicans, by the way. Let them live in bitter bubbles.

I am thankful that Hillary Clinton was defeated. As a baby boomer feminist myself, I am tired of the left's hijacking of the term. Conservative women are also feminists and understand the term means living life as you chose to live it.

If you had told me a year ago that I would welcome the inauguration of Donald Trump in 2017, I would have laughed. Now, though, I do welcome it. The uncertainty of a neophyte in the highest office in the land, along with the possibilities to shake it all up and begin doing the nation's business in a better, more efficient way far outweighs the certain disaster of Hillary Clinton. It was, in fact, a clear, binary choice for me.

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